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#1 2022-01-24 15:18:28

milikus
Member
Registered: 2022-01-24
Posts: 1

more than 3 years of support of updates possible?

Hi,

the support for Ubuntu itself with gnome is 5 Y.
X, K....Ubuntu has 3 Years.

Ubuntu has a esm, for longer support. but is still only gnome?

ist there/here a Xfce buy option for longer support? I have to do a new install at every Xubuntu system all 3 years?

Companys are all using gnome or witch is a good solution?

Thank you

Martin

Last edited by milikus (2022-01-24 18:41:11)

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#2 2022-01-24 20:02:47

ToZ
Moderator
From: Canada
Registered: 2011-06-02
Posts: 8,832

Re: more than 3 years of support of updates possible?

Hello and welcome.

To begin with, I think it might be helpful to clear up a few things. Xfce is what's considered an "upstream project". It is developed separate from the Ubuntu's which are considered distributions. A distribution, like ubuntu, will package, deploy, maintain a collection of upstream projects into one functional solution that you install and run. It is the distribution that manages the support and long-term support options. In the case of Xubuntu, it uses the upstream Xfce desktop environment. These are the forums for that desktop environment.

the support for Ubuntu itself with gnome is 5 Y.
X, K....Ubuntu has 3 Years.

Ubuntu has a esm, for longer support. but is still only gnome?

ist there/here a Xfce buy option for longer support? I have to do a new install at every Xubuntu system all 3 years?

To answer questions specifically about support for the distribution, I would direct you to Ubuntu. This is their offering. Xfce itself, for the most part, only maintains the latest most up-date-version (with the occasional backporting to the previous version). It provides no "official" support outside of the forums, the IRC channels, mailing lists, and other areas of expertise as are scattered about the internet. The long-term support you are referring to is something that is offered by the distribution - in this case Ubuntu.

The other thing that might of interest is regarding the two different types of distros - release based like ubuntu, or rolling. Rolling distros (like Arch Linux) are continually kept up to date. When a new version of an upstream package is released, it is relatively quickly integrated into the distro. There is no need to upgrade every 3 years to get access to the current packages. There are pros and cons to this approach - you have the most recent packages, but stability may be impacted (you don't have the benefit of long use to iron out bugs).

Companys are all using gnome or witch is a good solution?

It is difficult to answer the question on "what is best" as it really depends on a lot of factors: what your use case is, how versed you are with Linux, what is your appetite for new releases vs stability, etc. I'm not sure I've seen any accurate stats on which desktop environments are more commonly used so its a difficult question to answer.

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